Note Cards - Southwest - Wholesale Product Listings

Listing of all Note Cards - Southwest we have available for wholesale. This page shows the front image and description that comes with each card. Please check our wholesale information page for additional product and wholesale details. 

 

Tootòotsam - Hummingbirds NCO1

Four hummingbirds swirl into the four directions, flying above a field of sunflowers. For the Hopi people, hummingbirds symbolize moisture and prayers for the flourishing of crops and the blooming of earth's plants. The hummingbirds are related to the sun, the sunflowers, and the rainbow. They gather the nectar of the plants that grow from the sun and their feathers represent the colors of the rainbow which bring moisture to the earth.

 

Mimbres Journey NC02

Four Mimbres women and men reach out to the four directions among clouds and animals that are a part of thier world. An ancient people, the Mimbres lived in what is now southwestern New Mexico. They farmed corn, beans, and squash along a rive the Spanish called Mimbres, for its many willows. By 1150 CE, the Mimbres people began migrating out from the Mimbres river and today, the pueblo people of New Mexico and Arizona are among their descendants.

 

Earth Bundle NC03 

Image is from an original painting created on white buckskin that was sent aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in April of 1994. In the center is the Sun - Taawa. Above the sun are the symbols of the Earth, the Fourth world to the Hopi people, and below the moon. Radiating from the sun are markings representing the milky way. Within the stars are four corn plants, a symbol of the f our directions and of the life that inhabits the fourth world. This is all encompassed by a rainbow - a symbol of life. Placed with the Earth Bundle was a Paaho, a prayer feather for the blessings and prayers for the Astronauts journey. Six Navajo stone fetishes were also included and the whole was blessed by a Tohono O'odham spiritual healer.

 

Tuuwaqatsi - Earth, The Fourth World NC04

For the Hopi people this world is named Tuuwaqatsi. In Hopi lore, the Creator had formed three previous worlds. The first two worlds became imperfect and were destroyed. The Third became corrupted and those  who followed the Creator's path, searched for a way to leave. Through the help of animals and plants, the people were able to leave and emerge into this world, Tuuwaqatsi. Image depicts four hands representing the migrations that the Hopi clans have taken. Rain cloud symbols surround the earth, life giving moisture.

 

 

Warrior Mouse NC05

Aliksa'i, The People in the Hopi village of Oravyi, were known to have many chickens. One day some of the chickens disappeared, and the next day more were gone. The people soon discovered a hawk was killing the chickens. They were afraid hawk would soon take all the chickens. The young men tried to stop the hawk but to no avail. The men tried to stop the hawk but failed. The villagers called a meeting to discuss how to stop hawk (Includes the full Hopi Story about how Mouse saved the village from the Hawk.)

Yöngösont - Turtles NC06

Four turtles swim along the waters edge, surrounded by an earth line containing four flower blossoms. Fish and frogs swim below the waters surface. For the Hopi, turtles are an important symbol of rain and a companion to the clouds. They represent an abundance of water as they are only found near rivers and streams. At Hopi turtles are often found near Hopi at Paayu - the Little Colorado river.

 

Kwaahu - Eagle NC07

The image depicts a Hopi Eagle spirit, soaring across Taawa, the sun. Kwaahu watches over and protects a figure representing the migrations of humanity - the journeys that people take in life. For the Hopi people, Kwaahu is an important part of Hopi culture and is represented by KwaaKatsina, a spiritual being, who visits the Hopi people. KwaaKatsina performs in a ceremony to pray for moisture and a bountiful harvest of food for the people and to continue the relationship between the Hopi and eagles.

 

Nami'nangwat yankyangw um kwilalatani - Go along in life with love for one another NC08

A couple reaches out to one another for support and friendship. The woman carries a Paaho, a prayer feather made for the blessings of all people. The man carries Hooma, ceremonial cornmeal used in prayers and blessings toward the new day. Behind the couple is a symbol representing the four directions and the journey one takes in life.

 

 

Povolhoya - Butterflies NC09

Butterflies flutter away from desert sunflowers surrounded by a rainbow. These colorful beings are an important element in Hopi culture, they represent moisture, rain, fertility, and life. The Butterfly plays an important role in a ceremony named "Poliitikive" or the Butterfly dance, in which young girls represent the spirit of the butterflies traveling from flower to flower pollinating and giving life to the world around them. Sunflowers express the promise of life after rain, this symbol is placed on wicker plaques that are given to infant girls in their first year of life

Paavönmanàtuy - Young Corn Plants NC10

A couple plants seeds to grow a corn plant, A symbol of life for the Hopi people. Corn is not only an important food source but has great spiritual meaning and plays an important role in ceremonies.
This image shows a maiden who has cared for the best seeds from the past harvest. She plants them in a place prepared by her companion who uses a "hangwànpi", a digging stick. below a fish, frog, and turtle remind us of the life giving water. Katsinam, spiritual beings watch over the couple as dragonflies play around a rain cloud which brings life to the couple and plants.

 

 

Corn Maiden NC11

A young Hopi maiden stands among blue corn as rain clouds bring moisture to the plants. She wraps herself from the early morning with a blanket carrying star symbols. Corn is very important in Hopi culture. When the Hopi people first came to this world, Tuuwaqatsi - the fourth world to the Hopi, they chose a small blue corn representing their life: a life of long existence and challenges. In a ceremony to bring a child into this world, it is a perfect ear of white corn that symbolizes the mother of a child.  Corn is used for food, flour, and for ceremonies and prayer. Corn is symbolic of the Hopi women, for they both give life and sustain the people and their culture.

Hahay'i'wùuti Tihu - Grandmother Cradle Doll NC19

Hahay'i’iwùuti represents the best qualities a Hopi aspires to. The tihu or doll represents Grandmother katsina. It is the first doll a child receives the first year of life during a ceremony named Powamuya. She is a reminder to the child that one of their greatest achivements is becoming an elder. As an elder, they lived a long life, gathering wisdom, knowledge and have generations of family before them. In Hopi culture, many of the leadership roles are only held by elders. The tihu is placed upon a plaque made of plant fibers woven into a sunflower design - a source of food, the seeds promise a continuation of life. Tied to the plaque are bundles of bean sprouts that represent the coming of a new growing season. Children will give these sprouts to their mothers who make a soup to be enjoyed by all.

 

Kyaaro - Parrot NC26

A parrot gathers berries encircled with leaves. For the Hopi, these colorful birds are friends with the sun and rainbows. The Parrot's colors invoke the sun's rays which give growth to the plants and as the rainclouds part, it is the sun who shows the rainbow, a reminder of life giving moisture. The Pueblo people have traded these colorful birds from Mesoamerican people since 750 C.E., representing a long history of contact among native people in the Americas. 

I'Itoi Ki: Maze of Life NC27

Also known as the “Man in the Maze” it is one of the more well known designs that is found in O’odham culture. I’itoi Ki: or I’itoi’s House refers to the Creator called Elder Brother who travels a circular path to his home. This path also represents a person’s own journey through life, each turn symbolizing a life changing event. At the end of the maze a alcove allows one to reflect on one’s life before journeying onward to the center. Behind the maze is a Hohokam image with a water motif representing the rivers and rain that is vital to a desert people.

 

I'Itoi Ki: Maze of Life with Friendship Ceremony NC28

Also known as the “Man in the Maze” it is one of the more well known designs that is found in O’odham culture. I’itoi Ki: or I’itoi’s House refers to the Creator called Elder Brother who travels a circular path to his home. This path also represents a person’s own journey through life, each turn symbolizing a life changing event. At the end of the maze a alcove allows one to reflect on one’s life before journeying onward to the center. Behind the maze is a Hohokam image with a water motif representing the rivers and rain that is vital to a desert people. Surrounding the maze are people in a ceremonial dance holding hands celebrating the coming of the rains.