Poston Memorial Monument

Poston_NC_Mockup.jpg
JapaneseAmericanMonument.jpg
Poston_NC_Mockup.jpg
JapaneseAmericanMonument.jpg

Poston Memorial Monument

5.00

Photo Note Card

Photography by Gerald Dawavendewa (Hopi & Cherokee)

“This memorial is dedicated to all those men, women and children who suffered countless hardships and indignities at the hands of a nation misguided by wartime hysteria, racial prejudice and fear. May it serve as a constant reminder of our past so that Americans in the future will never again be denied their constitutional rights and may the remembrances of that experience serve to advance the evolution of the human spirit.”

This memorial monument marks the site of the Poston War Relocation Center where 17,867 persons of Japanese ancestry, the majority of whom were United States Citizens, were interned during World War II. From May 1942 to November 1945, all persons of Japanese descent living on west coast farms, businesses, towns, cities and states were forcibly evacuated by the United States Military on the grounds that they posed a threat to the National Security. This massive relocation was authorized by executive order 9066, signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942. (From Memorial plaque)

The Memorial Monument

A single thirty foot pillar symbolizes “unity of spirit”. The hexagonal base represents a stone lantern. Six bronze plaques line the lantern. Twelve small pillars surround the monument making it a working sundial. A second stone lantern with four plaques stands at the entrance of the Memorial Monument. Erected in 1992 by the Colorado River Indian Tribes, Former Internees of Poston, Veterans and Friends of the Fiftieth Year Observance of the Evacuation and Internment.

Measures 5 by 6.5 inches (12.7 by 16.51 cm) folded. Image is printed on glossy  photo paper. Notecard also includes above text on back. Also includes biography of photographer. Card is blank inside for you own personal message. Note card is enclosed in a resealable clear envelope.

50 percent of the sale of each card will go to the Poston Community Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving and sharing the history of the approximately 18,000 Japanese Americans who where incarcerated in the Poston Concentration Camp near Parker, Arizona during World War Two. You can find more information on the organization at: www.postonpreservation.org

 

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